Monday, October 24, 2016

MMGM: Turn of the Tide


When I see Roseanne Parry’s name on the cover of a book, I know I’m in for a treat. There’s a rare depth, heart, and honesty in all her books. As she’s a member of my local SCBWI, I’ve also had the pleasure of meeting her a few times, and she’s as nice as she seems. I was so excited when I heard about her newest book, THE TURN OF THE TIDE. Not only is this a great cousin story (how often do cousins feature in books?), but it’s set in beautiful Astoria, one of my favorite spots on the Oregon Coast.
Brace yourself. This is a good one.

Here’s the synopsis (from Amazon):

On a beautiful day in June, the ground broke open.

In Japan, you’re always prepared for an earthquake. That’s why Kai knows just what to do when the first rumbles shake the earth. But he does the exact opposite of what you’re supposed to do: He runs. And then the tsunami hits.

Meanwhile, on the other side of the Pacific, Kai’s cousin Jet sets sail off the coast of Astoria, Oregon. She knows she should have checked the tide—she always checks the tide. Except this time she didn’t.

When the biggest mistakes of their lives bring them together, Jet and Kai spend the summer regretting that one moment when they made the wrong decision. But there’s something about friendship that heals all wounds, and together, Jet and Kai find the one thing they never thought they’d have again—hope.


My favorite things about TURN OF THE TIDE:

1.   A book about cousins: Siblings and friends feature prominently in kidlit, but I can’t think of another book that deals with cousins. As I never had any cousins my own age as a kid, I felt like I got to live vicariously through Jet and Kai’s friendship. Hooray for working together and family loyalty!

2.  A warm, interesting family: Jet’s family is the kind of family you’d love to hang out with—I loved their teasing, their inside jokes, and their boisterousness. There was something about them that seemed so real—like they might live next door.

3.  The Japanese element: I have stayed away from reviews of this book, trying not to spoil it for myself, so I didn’t know Kai was Japanese and affected by a tsunami till I hoped the book. The cultural differences, his heartache over his family, and the way he comes to terms with his dad’s Swedish-American heritage was really well done. And I loved reading about Japanese culture, food and traditions.

4.  Interesting minor characters: Jet’s dad and his brother have to be some of the most memorable characters I’ve read in awhile. I loved how Dad fills up a room with his booming voice and mannerisms—and Oliver, Jet’s kid brother! Who couldn’t love this kid who dreams of being a pirate and reads book like THE THREE MUSKETEERS?

5. A satisfying ending: I won’t give it away, but I’ve noticed in Parry’s books that’s there’s always an element of sacrifice in the climax. I love what this leaves with the reader: even the main characters’ goals are not more important than helping others.

6.  Setting: It’s set in Astoria, Oregon, home of the Goonies! I'm always excited to read books set in my home state. It’s pure fun reminiscing about some of the places she mentioned.

If you’ve enjoyed Parry’s other books, you will probably enjoy this, although like her other books, it's unique in its own way. I think it would compare most closely with HEART OF THE SHEPHERD, but with a treasure hunt boat race!


Have you read any books with a lot of heart lately?


(This post contains an Amazon affiliate link.  Thank you for your support!)

To check out more Marvelous Middle Grade suggestions, check out Shannon Messenger's blog. 









17 comments:

  1. Sounds like a great story. I did have cousins growing up who lived down the street and we're still close.

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    1. How fun that they lived down the street and that you're still close. I'm glad my own kids are growing up seeing their own cousins often.

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  2. I so enjoyed this story when I read it recently. I hope many others will do the same.

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  3. Must admit, I can't think of many books featuring cousins.

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    1. And yet, cousins are such a big part of most kids' lives.

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  4. I certainly can't think of another story like it.

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    1. So true! I wonder why there aren't more cousins in books?

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  5. You're right: cousins don't feature in MG books very often at all. I've seen this reviewed on other blogs recently. Must add to the list!

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    1. I think you'll really enjoy this, Joanne!

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  6. If the cousins live across the oceans, how do they come together? You must have left us wondering. It sounds like a book filled with heart.

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    1. I don't think I'm spoiling to tell you this: Kai has to go stay with his cousin because of the tsunami. I hope you enjoy it, Pat!

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  7. This sounds really delightful! I was super close to my cousins growing up, so my heart leapt a little when you mentioned that. It's going on my TBR pile!

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  8. This sounds like a wonderful read. I'm going to have to pick it up as soon as the craziness dies down for me.

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  9. Cousins! I have a TON of those and miss them terribly. It's been a while since I read a "sweet" story. Probably because of Halloween. And the book release. =)

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  10. Thanks so much for sharing my book, Jenni.
    I love my cousins and my kids have a huge happy stack of cousins too so it was a natural relationship to explore.
    Except for Eustace in the Narnia books and Little Men by Alcott, I can't think of many cousin books either.
    Thanks again!

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  11. I've never read any of Perry's books, but this book sounds wonderful! Very heartwarming! :)

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